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That’s right folks, my favorite horror movie to watch around Halloween is: Friday the 13th. I mean, how can you go wrong? A group of camp counselors being murdered off one by one; it’s a classic. The killer is great as well; a giant facially deformed man wearing a hockey mask…(insert disc scratch noise here). Wait, well….maybe this isn’t my favorite in the franchise. Well shit, I guess I will still talk about this movie for a little bit. Here is a quick synopsis. The movie starts out in 1958 with two camp counselors about to do the horizontal limbo, when they are interrupted by someone who’s identity is not revealed. This said mystery person murders the two counselors and the movie goes to the title screen. Fast forward about 21 years to 1979. We see a character named Annie (Robbi Morgan) entering into a truck stop diner in the hopes of getting a ride to the newly re-opened Camp Crystal Lake. A trucker in the dive agrees to give Annie a ride, but only half-way. This is when we meet Ralph (Walt Gorney). Everyone is town calls him a loon. When he hears that the camp is re-opened, he starts playing the part of the harbinger, saying that the camp has a “death curse” and that they are all doomed. Naturally, no one believes Ralph and zero fucks are given. Back at the camp, Bill (Harry Crosby), Ned (Mark Nelson), Marcie (Jeannine Taylor), Alice (Adrienne King), Brenda (Laurie Bartram), Steve Christy (Peter Brouer) the camp owner and…oh yeah, Jack, played by a pre-tremors star (Kevin Bacon). They are all refurbishing the camp and cabins in time for opening day. One day, during all the renovating, Steve realizes that they need more supplies, so he prepares to head back into town. Before he leaves he tells everyone to prepare for a bad storm that is on its way. So, when the only responsible person is leaving a camp with a bunch of horny late teens or twenty-somethings behind in a slasher film, I think you know what is going to happen…no not just sex! Geez, get your mind out of the gutter!

As I stated before, this isn’t my favorite in the franchise. I cared more for Jason being the killer and found the recipe used with him was far more interesting. That isn’t to say that this movie doesn’t have its moments; it’s just that when you  find out who the killer is, you will feel that the murders are a little bit implausible.  Directed and produced by Sean S. Cunningham, this is another one of those low budget movies that made a lot of money. The initial budget was only $550,000. When the dust settled the tally came out to $59,754,601 earned. That is pretty good, but, despite those numbers, the movie was greatly panned by critics. Siskle and Ebert devoted a whole episode of their show to bash on this and other slasher movies of the time period. Siskle disliked the film so much that he posted the private information of some people involved with the film and encouraged watchers to bombard them with hate mail. Damn, that is cold! Despite all this, the movie is seen by many as a staple in their slasher collections; as do I. My favorite though is this movie…

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Now I know I left out a lot of classic horror movies this month, but this was just a taste of some of the movies I like to watch every year around Halloween. What’s your favorite horror movie you like to watch during October? Please leave me your thoughts in the comments. I would also love it if you subscribed to my blog via e-mail or RSS, and while you are over there, tickle the Facebook button to follow me there.

That’s it for my Halloween-based blogs folks! I hope you all have a spooky good Halloween! Join me in the upcoming weeks to see what new things are brewing and…

As always, thanks for reading and please joins us next time!

References:

All images and information was gathered from www.wikipedia.org.

Friday the 13th was Directed and Produced by: Sean S. Cunningham and Distributed by: Paramount Pictures: May 9, 1980.

Friday the 13th part VI: Jason Lives was Directed by: Tom McLoughlin and Produced by: Don Behrns and Distributed by: Paramount Pictures: August 1, 1986.